Professors Urge Congress to Ignore Flawed, Unreliable Data in Patent Debate

On March 10, 2015, 40 economists and law professors signed a letter explaining to Congress that the data that keeps being cited to justify HR 9, otherwise known as “the Innovation Act,” is “flawed, unreliable and incomplete.” The professors suggest Congress proceed cautiously, particularly given the numerous misleading and flawed studies that make “highly exaggerated claims regarding patent trolls.”

As the letter explains, one of the “studies” that is often cited as proof that patent trolls cost U.S. businesses $29 billion a year is pure fiction, has been debunked, and the authors of the study have retreated significantly from their clearly erroneous conclusions. I have explained this issue in detail, as have others.

Read the rest of this entry »

03.23.15 | Patent Issues, Patent Reform, posts | Gene Quinn

An interview with Microsoft’s Chief Patent Counsel

Micky Minhas (pictured left) is Chief Patent Counsel for Microsoft Corporation. He is also someone that I have known for more than 20 years. Like me, Minhas is a graduate of Franklin Pierce Law Center (now part of the University of New Hampshire). What follows are excerpts from my interview with Minhas, which took place on February 20, 2015. You can read the entire interview here.

Minhas on the current state of the law and why Microsoft has adopted the European technical standard as a safe harbor approach to drafting software patent applications:

MINHAS: I think we’re in a period of uncertainty where many participants in the field are wondering where that line on subject-matter eligibility is. I view this debate as a pendulum that had State Street on one end and now it is swinging or has already swung back to the other side with Alice. That depends on how you interpret and if you see any cohesion among all the cases that we’ve seen. So I think the patent practitioner community is in a somewhat uncertain place with respect to U.S. law. In terms of our patent cases – they have been written to satisfy various standards of patentability. A few years ago we ramped up our foreign filings and recognized that we’re writing this one document, this one patent application, for so many different audiences. We started settling in on the European technical standard as a guide for how to draft, how to cover the innovation from that vantage point, in order to try to write this document that would satisfy the USPTO as well as the EPO, Chinese Patent Office, the Japanese Patent Office, and so on. So for me, what this environment means as a practitioner has more to do with how the patent is drafted and how we capture the innovation, and not really a huge difference about what the underlying innovation is or how it’s implemented.

Read the rest of this entry »

03.20.15 | Patent Issues | Gene Quinn

Fee-Shifting Provisions Front and Center in Innovation Act

In April 2014, the United States Supreme Court addressed the issue of awarding attorney’s fees under 35 U.S.C. § 285 to successful litigants in a patent infringement proceeding. The decision in Octane Fitness, LLC v. ICON Health & Fitness, Inc., was the primary decision simply because that case was treated first by the Court and formed the basis of the Court’s decision in Highmark, Inc. v. Allcare Health Management System, Inc. Essentially, the Supreme Court in these two cases ruled that an appellate court should apply an abuse-of-discretion standard in reviewing all aspects of a district court’s § 285 determination. Those familiar with the abuse-of-discretion standard know that it is a difficult standard of review, which should mean that district courts will have far more latitude to handle attorney’s fee awards without meddling from the Federal Circuit.

After these decisions by the Supreme Court, patent reform died in the Senate after lopsided passage in the House. Politically, and procedurally, the problem for patent reform in 2014 wound up being that the Supreme Court mooted one of the leading drivers of this round of reform — fee-shifting. But that hasn’t stopped patent reform advocates from once again pushing the Innovation Act in 2015, which is identical to the Innovation Act from 2014 that died in the Senate.

Read the rest of this entry »

What every startup needs to hear about patents

Fatih Ozluturk is a prolific inventor, with 186 issued patents and 181 pending patent applications. His inventions have been licensed to every major cellular company, and have generated over $1 billion in licensing revenue. Today, Ozluturk is a Principal of the Soryn IP Group, and also Director of Patent Strategy at Liquid Patent Consulting. He is also an entrepreneur and an angel investor, he teaches workshops in the NYC startup community, and he is the author of the book “Patents. Simplified.”

I spoke with Ozluturk on the record in a lengthy interview that really should be required reading for anyone who is contemplating starting a software-based tech company. We discussed the importance of at least filing a provisional patent application even if you are not sure you want to get a patent, and we also talked about how easy it is to write software but how extremely difficult it is to write useful software. Read the rest of this entry »

03.4.15 | posts | Gene Quinn

On the record with former WIPO Deputy Director Jim Pooley

James Pooley is a U.S. patent attorney with over 35 years’ experience as a successful Silicon Valley trial lawyer. Most recently, however, Pooley spent 5 years in Geneva, Switzerland as a diplomat and manager of the international patent system. In his capacity as Deputy Director General of the World Intellectual Property Organization, Pooley was responsible for management of the Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT), managing staff from 60 countries and working with the governments and NGOs in every region of the world.

I caught up with Pooley on January 22, 2015. In our wide-ranging discussion, we talked about his time at WIPO, harmonization, the need for a true international grace period, the European financial crisis and the likelihood that Congress will take up federal trade secret legislation in 2015. To read the complete 3-part interview, please visit IPWatchdog.com. What follows are some of the highlights of our discussion.

Read the rest of this entry »

03.2.15 | Patent Issues | Gene Quinn

PLI Recommends

  • Live Seminar
  • Featured Treatise
  • Live Seminar

     


IPWatchdog





Blogroll

Recent Posts

Topics